Self esteem

The smile machine to generate positive thinking in children


We are all clear that positive thoughts are like an engine within learning. They reinforce self-esteem, invite to dream, increase illusions and enhance the abilities of each one. Well, and how to enhance all this in children? Through play!

The psychologist Celia Rodríguez has devised a fantastic game about: the smile machine to generate positive thinking in children. The little ones will find it a lot of fun and in the long run they will be benefiting and taking care of their emotional and physical health without knowing it. Never underestimate the power of a smile!

The game is very simple, and you don't need many materials. All are also easy to get, since this game is made with recycled materials. Write down everything you need:

- A box

- Paper or cardboard

- Ballpoint pen or colored markers

IGame instructions:

1. First we must explain to the children what to write on the paper or cardboard. We invite you to think carefully about all the things that make you smile throughout the day, even on the saddest days.

2. So, once you have thought about it all, you have to jot down their list of things that make them smile, using the colors they want. They can point to 'a hug' with a bright red color, or draw a star if it's something that makes you smile.

3. There is no time, but if you notice that he is not able to recognize things that make him smile, can you help him with some example. You can say, 'And doesn't your brother make you smile when he gets home?' 'And when you discover that today you have your favorite snack? ...

4. When you have your list of things that make you smile, you must keep the paper in a box. But this box is special. To make it a smile factory, you need to decorate it.

5. Decorate the box with your child. Use markers and paper if necessary. Let your imagination do the rest. Of course, it must have a very clear sign where it reads: 'Smile machine'.

6. Once your child has the smile machine, you should explain the following: Your smile machine should be in one place in your room. Every day you should smile at least three times, and if you don't, you should go to your smile machine to read your list and generate more smiles.

7. Every time your child smiles for something that was not on the list, they should open their smile machine and point it in the list. Thus, your list of things that make you smile will grow and grow without end.

This game has no age limit. They can play from the youngest (from approximately 4 years) to the oldest (grandparents included). The more participants get involved in the game, the more fun and enriching it is.

Children, like grown-ups, they have better and worse days, days in which everything seems to go well for them and others, however, more 'sad'. To face that feeling of sadness, nothing like positive thinking. Therefore, the smile machine can be very useful. This fun game looks for very specific objectives. Among them:

- Teach children to identify those things that really make them feel good
Sometimes, especially among the little ones, they fail to recognize their emotions correctly, and end up giving more importance to negative emotions, since they affect them much more. With this game, they will learn to also recognize their positive emotions and to give them the importance they deserve.

- Enhance positive thoughts over negative ones
Although it's easier to slip into defeatist thinking when things don't go well, there is the strength of positive thinking to turn it around. There are two ways to deal with defeat: surrender or try again. Positive thinking makes you never give up.

- Be grateful for all the good things that happen throughout the day
Gratitude is an essential value in children (and in the elderly). Since childhood, he strengthens that feeling of gratitude for all the good things he experiences throughout a day.

You can read more articles similar to The smile machine to generate positive thinking in children, in the category of Self-esteem on site.

Video: The Enlightenment: Crash Course European History #18 (September 2020).