Writing

Short and funny Christmas dictation for children with the letter H


H is a bit of a magic letter in Spanish, right? When it should be and is not, we miss it. However, even if it is, it does not sound, it is mute. Therefore, it is difficult to learn when to write it and when not. To help children learn the use of the letter H, we propose you a short and funny Christmas dictation on video. Also, we talked about the different spelling rules.

The video dictation that we propose is the following. If you don't want to put the video in which we dictate it to your children, you can read it yourself. Do it at a slow pace, so they have time to write everything down. But, still, we recommend that you repeat it one more time in case any word has escaped you.

There, between the orchard and the fireplace, he slipped

the gingerbread man with ice. Therefore

he was hurt at dinner on Christmas Eve. Now

he already has a better arm bone.

Did you like the dictation? We are going to correct it below to learn from all the doubts that may have arisen during the dictation. We started!

- 'There' is the first word of the dictation, so we have to write it with a capital letter and with an accent in the I (it is acute and ends in a vowel). Also, it is written with H interleaved. This word often creates a lot of confusion in children, so it is important to emphasize it so that they memorize how to spell it correctly.

- 'Between' is written without H, and is a preposition.

- 'Huerta' does have H, like all words that have the diphthong ue.

- 'Chimney' is written with H, since it is the CH sound: cha, che, chi, cho or chu.

- 'Man', also goes with H. We can't forget it!

- 'Ginger' is a somewhat special word, because it is more complicated to write. The first is written with J, the second with G and then with B. And it is that the sounds bra, bre, bri, bro, bru are written with B.

- 'Ice' is also spelled with H, like iron, bile or hyena.

- 'Was' comes from the verb to be, so it does not have H. However, 'wounded' does have H, as a wound or wound.

- 'Christmas Eve' is capitalized because it is a proper name and with CH.

- 'Now' has H inserted.

- 'Bone' goes with H like the rest of words with UE. However, we must be careful for osseous or ossuary, which are words derived from bone, they do not carry H.

By the way, we hope the gingerbread man has less pain in his arm!

Although we have already seen some spelling rules, we will now review a little more extensive, without being complicated, by the different rules that govern the use of H. This simple review will be very useful for children, but also for adults because, let's face it, sometimes we dance some H.

- When a word has the following prefixes, it is written with H:hydra-, hydro-, hyper- and hypo-. Some examples of these words are hydrogen or hypochondriac.

- If a word begins with diphthong eu, It is also written with H. For example, hole or garden.

- The prefixes also go with H hecto-, hepta-, hexa- and hemi-. As an example we can name heptagon or hemisphere.

- When a word goes with H, its compounds also carry it. For example: ant is written with H, so anthill also carries it. However, there are some exceptions to keep in mind such as words derived from bone (bone), egg (ovule), hollow (hollow) and orphan (orphan).

- All forms of verbs whose infinitive also have H go with H, such as there was or speaks.

Homophone words

Have your children studied the homophones? As the name suggests, they are all those that sound the same but have a different meaning. On certain occasions, one of the couple wears H while the other does not, so it is worth stopping for a moment and learning some examples.

  • Hello: friendly greetings / Wave: movement of the sea
  • Done: it comes from the verb to do (The bread is already done) / Echo: it comes from the verb to throw (I pour the water into the jug).
  • Browse: turn pages / Browse: look
  • Honda: adjective meaning deep / Wave: a ripple
  • Until: preposition / Antler: horn of an animal

There, there and ay

Other forms with H that cause confusion in children and adults are there, there and ay. And they sound similar, but they are written differently. Let's see!

  • Hay: comes from the verb have, so it is written with H.
  • There: adverb of place. It has the H inserted!
  • Ay: it is an interjection that is used to express pain or discomfort.

To remember well, I always think of the following phrase: 'There is a child who says oh why he fell'. Impossible to forget like this!

Ha, a and ah

And finally, we review another common doubt. When do you write ha, a or ah? Let's see what each of them corresponds to.

  • Ha: It comes from the verb haber and is an auxiliary verb that accompanies a participle. For example: My dog ​​has eaten feed.
  • A: It is a preposition. For example: I go to my father's house.
  • Ah: This is an interjection to express surprise.

In case you want to continue working on the use of H, here are some other dictations that can help you:

1. Oh, my bone hurts! Since I broke it in Huesca and made those wounds, it doesn't stop hurting.

2. On the shelf in the garden I have left you the chicken eggs. To cook them, I always add salt and oil. Do it the same and you will see how delicious.

3. Horacio surfed to the biggest wave that was yesterday. He's not afraid of anything.

4. There, on sheet number eight, is the dog's footprint! Now it only remains to leaf through the book to see if it is on more pages.

5. Esther has always struck me as a bit of a hypocrite. However, her sister Ana is much kinder.

6. You would have to take the shortcut to go to Uncle Heraclitus' estate. This path is much shorter.

You can read more articles similar to Short and funny Christmas dictation for children with the letter H, in the category of On-Site Writing.

Video: Easy Letter H Craft -- Preschool Alphabet Resource (September 2020).